Allison Bailey » Members

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Allison Bailey

Post-doctoral researcher Norwegian Polar InstituteResearch department: Ecotoxicology
Work address Norwegian Polar Institute Fram Centre Tromsø 9296 Norway Work Phone: +47 77 75 05 57
Photo of Allison Bailey

Biography

Research interests:

  • Physiological and evolutionary responses to climate change drivers
  • Investigating local adaptation of populations living along environmental gradients as an indication of their response to future environmental change
  • Ocean acidification
  • Arctic copepods
  • The role of acclimatization and adaptation in allowing populations to cope with environmental change
  • The role of lipid storage in the life cycles of Arctic Calanus spp.

Running national and international projects:

  • 2019-2023: Arctic Marine Evolution: using local adaptation to infer future evolutionary responses of Calanus copepods to a changing environment (EvoCal), NFR. Co-project leader
  • 2018-2020 : Ocean Acidification – Drivers and Effects on Arctic Marine organisms and ecosystems (OA-DREAM). Fram Centre Flagship. Post-doc funding source.

 

Relevant scientific publications:

  1. Thor P, Bailey A, Dupont S, Calosi P, Søreide J, De Wit P, Guscelli E, Loubet-Sartrou L, Deichmann I, Candee M, Svensen C, King AL, Bellerby GJ (2018) Contrasting physiological responses to future ocean acidification among Arctic copepod populations. Global Change Biology 24(1). doi 10.1111/gcb.13870
  2. Bailey A, de Wit P, Thor P, Browman HI, Bjelland R, Shema S, Fields DM, Runge JA, Thompson C, Hop H (2017) Regulation of gene expression is associated with tolerance of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis to CO2-acidified seawater. Ecology and Evolution 7(12). doi 10.1002/ece3.3063
  3. Assmy P, Fernández-Méndez M, Duarte P, Meyer A, Randelhoff A, Mundy CJ, Olsen LM, Kauko HM, Bailey A, Chierici M, Cohen L, Doulgeris AP, Ehn JK, Fransson A, Gerland S, Hop H, Hudson SR, Hughes N, Itkin P, Geir Johnsen G, King JA, Koch BP, Koenig Z, Kwasniewski S, Laney SR, Nicolaus M, Pavlov AK, Polashenski CM, Provost C, Rösel A, Sandbu M, Spreen G, Smedsrud LH, Sundfjord A, Taskjelle T, Tatarek A, Wiktor J, Wagner PM, Wold A, Steen H & Granskog MA (2017) Leads in Arctic pack ice enable early phytoplankton blooms below snow-covered sea ice. Scientific Reports 7. doi 10.1038/srep40850
  4. Thor P, Bailey A, Halsband C, Guscelli E, Gorokhova E, Fransson A (2016) Seawater pH predicted for the year 2100 affects the metabolic response to feeding in copepodites of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis. PLoS ONE 11(12):e0168735. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0168735
  5. Bailey A, Thor P, Browman HI, Fields DM, Runge J, Vermont A, Bjelland R, Thompson C, Shema S, Durif CMF, Hop H (2016) Early life stages of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis are unaffected by increased seawater pCO2. ICES Journal of Marine Science 74 (4):996–1004. doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsw066
  6. Harvey B, Al-Janabi B, Broszeit S, Cioffi R, Kumar A, Aranguren-Gassis M, Bailey A, Green L, Gsottbauer C, Hall E, Lechler M, Mancuso F, Pereira C, Ricevuto E, Schram J, Stapp L, Stenberg S, Rosa L (2014) Evolution of Marine Organisms under Climate Change at Different Levels of Biological Organisation. Water 6:3545–3574
  7. Gabrielsen TM, Merkel B, Søreide JE, Johansson-Karlsson E, Bailey A, Vogedes D, Nygård H, Varpe Ø, Berge J (2012) Potential misidentifications of two climate indicator species of the marine arctic ecosystem: Calanus glacialis and C. finmarchicus. Polar Biology 35:1621–1628
  8. Karnovsky N, Harding A, Walkusz W, Kwaśniewski S, Goszczko I, Wiktor J, Routti H, Bailey A, McFadden L, Brown Z, Beaugrand G, Grémillet D (2010) Foraging distributions of little auks Alle alle across the Greenland Sea: Implications of present and future Arctic climate change. Marine Ecology Progress Series 415:283–293